Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Poster: Toot Your Horn


If you don’t toot your own horn, nobody else will.
(Proverb from the USA)

The source for the proverb is David Crystal's book, As They Say in Zanzibar: Proverbial Wisdom from Around the World (Oxford University Press: 2006). The poster is made with AutoMotivator.

The image is by ep_jhu at Flickr.

Latin LOLCat: Peace

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. For those of you who study Latin, this is a great way to remember the sneaky neuter ending for comparative adjectives: gratior is the masculine/feminine word meaning "more welcome," while gratius is the neuter form. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Nihil gratius pace.

Nothing is more welcome than peace.


Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Latin LOLCat: Every Day

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. I made this LOLCat for a special blog post at my OU Digital Tools blog, and I have some notes about the Latin saying at the Audio Latin Proverbs blog. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Nulla dies sine linea.

No day without a line.


Poster: Go Around



Better to go around the manure than to move it.
(Polish: Gówno lepiej obejść, jak ruszyć.)


The poster is made with AutoMotivator. The image is a picture of manure at Wikipedia.

Monday, July 21, 2014

Latin LOLCat: Brothers

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. The words come from the Roman historian Sallust. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Quis amicior quam frater fratri?

Who is a greater friend than a brother is to his brother?


Poster: The Soul



Yet stab at thee who will, no stab the soul can kill!
(Sir Walter Raleigh)

The source for the proverb is Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical by Charles Noel Douglas (Bartleby.com). The poster is made with AutoMotivator. The image shows the duel of Volker the minstrel and Islan the monk at Wikipedia.


Sunday, July 20, 2014

Poster: Lay the Egg


First lay the egg, then cackle.
(Estonian proverb)

The source for the proverb is David Crystal's book, As They Say in Zanzibar: Proverbial Wisdom from Around the World (Oxford University Press: 2006).

The image is by randomtruth at Flickr.

The poster is made with AutoMotivator.

Latin LOLCat: Doubt

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. This phrase is famously associated with Rene Descartes, and there is even a philosophical method named "Cartesian doubt" in his honor. The Latin word dubium has as its root the word duo, two. Something that is dubium, a matter of doubt, is about possibilities, the existence of two or more things that make claims to be true. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Dubium sapientiae initium.

Doubt is the beginning of wisdom.


Saturday, July 19, 2014

Latin LOLCat: Beyond

Here is today's Latin LOLCat; it is the Melville family motto. There is also a similar family motto: Audaciter aspicio ultro, "Boldly I look beyond." If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Ultra aspicio.

I look beyond.


Poster: Belling the Cat



No one will bell the cat.
(English proverb)


The source for the proverb is Early American Proverbs and Proverbial Phrases by Bartlett Jere Whiting (Amazon). The poster is made with AutoMotivator. The image is Milo Winter, illustrating Aesop's fable of the cat, the mice, and the bell (Flickr).

Friday, July 18, 2014

Latin LOLCat: Do and Be Done To

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. I took the positive interpretation of the saying in choosing this image; it can also be about negative symmetry of course: if you treat others unkindly, they will be unkind to you. Note that the Latin rhymes: geret - feret. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latinablog.

Qualia quisque geret, talia quisque feret.

What you do unto others will be done unto you.


Poster: All Things



No living man all things can.
(English proverb)

The source for the proverb is English Proverbs and Proverbial Phrases by William Carew Hazlitt (GoogleBooks). The poster is made with AutoMotivator. The image is of a one-man band; photo by Andrew Malone Flickr.


Thursday, July 17, 2014

Poster: Four Eyes


Those who can read and write have four eyes.
(Albanian proverb)

The source for the proverb is David Crystal's book, As They Say in Zanzibar: Proverbial Wisdom from Around the World (Oxford University Press: 2006).
The image is by cucosan at Flickr.
The poster is made with AutoMotivator.

Latin LOLCat: The Eyes

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

In oculis animus habitat.

The soul dwells in the eyes.