Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Poster: Books



Books: the children of the brain.
(Jonathan Swift)

The source for the proverb is Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical by Charles Noel Douglas (Bartleby.com). The poster is made with AutoMotivator. The image is a painting from Wikipedia.


Latin LOLCat: Look Out

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. The Latin word futurum is a future form of the verb "to be," meaning "that which is going to be, what is about to be" - hence "the future." If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Respice futurum.

Keep an eye on the future.


Monday, August 18, 2014

Latin LOLCat: Peace and Love

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. You can see a very different visual interpretation in Amoris divini emblemata by Otto Vaenius. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Una in sede morantur pax et amor.

Peace and love abide in one place.


Sunday, August 17, 2014

Poster: Movers and Shakes




World-losers and world-forsakers,
On whom the pale moon gleams:
Yet we are the movers and shakers
Of the world for ever, it seems.

Thanks to James Stansell at Google+, I learned about the origin of the phrase "movers and shakers." It comes from a poem entitled "Ode" by Arthur O'Shaughnessy. You can read more about the poem at Wikipedia. The moon photo is by klareralt at Flickr, and the poster is made with Automotivator.

Latin LOLCat: Voice

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. The idea here is a lot of talk, but nothing to show for it. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Vox et praeterea nihil.

A voice, and nothing more.


Poster: The Hedgehog



Deck a hedgehog, and he will seem a lord.
(English proverb)

The source for the proverb is English Proverbs and Proverbial Phrases by William Carew Hazlitt (GoogleBooks). And here is Hazlitt's note: “So said of a base Boure that will ranke himselfe out of his ranke.”—W. MS. Rawlinson, c. 86, fol. 31, quoted by Mr. Furnivall (Babees Book, &c., 1868). The poster is made with AutoMotivator. The image is by Krissy Venosdale at Flickr.


Saturday, August 16, 2014

Latin LOLCat: Love and Praise

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. You can find these words in a distich poem by the neo-Latin poet John Owen. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Ut lauderis, lauda; ut ameris, ama.

In order to be praised, you must praise; in order to be loved, you must love.


Friday, August 15, 2014

Latin LOLCat: Hope

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. Although the words "spes" and "exspecto" are not related in Latin, there is a nice sound echo - "spe" - between the two. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Spe exspecto.

I wait in hope.


Poster: Hope



Hope is a sweet deceit.
(Italian: Speranza dolce inganno.)


The poster is made with AutoMotivator. The image is at Cheezburger.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Latin LOLCat: Rara Avis

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. The phrase "rara avis" is sometimes used in English, and you can see the same Latin root for "bird" in our word "aviary." When it comes to birds, the "black swan" is a proverbial rare bird, but the phrase can be used to describe anything that is surpassing strange. If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Rara avis.

A rare bird.


Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Latin LOLCat: Mother and Daughter

Here is today's Latin LOLCat. Compare the English saying, "Like mother, like daughter." If you are interested in Latin proverbs and fables, check out the Bestiaria Latina blog.

Sicut mater, ita et filia eius.

Like mother, like daughter.


Poster: Watched Pot



A watched pot never boils.
(English proverb)


You can read about this English proverb online at The Phrase Finder. The poster is made with AutoMotivator. The image is from Wikipedia.